Vampire-like Predatory Bacteria Could Become A Living Antibiotic : Discover Magazine

“What’s the news: If bacteria had blood, the predatory microbe Micavibrio aeruginosavorus would essentially be a vampire: it subsists by hunting down other bugs, attaching to them, and sucking their life out. For the first time, researchers have sequenced the genome of this strange microorganism, which was first identified decades ago in sewage water. The […]

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Philips – Design Probes – Microbial Home

“The Microbial Home Probe consists of a domestic ecosystem that challenges conventional design solutions to energy, cleaning, food preservation, lighting, human waste and healthy lifestyle.” Very cool. And mentions of a Post Electronic Age, too. Read this article… Images from Philips – more at Microbial Home  

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Science Friday Video: An Outhouse For The Sea

“This toilet floats. It’s an outhouse and sewage-treatment plant in one, processing human waste through a “constructed wetlands.” Adam Katzman, the inventor and builder of the toilet-boat, says it’s meant to be more inspirational than practical. “Poop and Paddle” demonstrates how sewage and rainwater can be converted to cattails and clean water.” This is so […]

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Mind-Altering Bugs – ScienceNOW

“Hundreds of species of bacteria call the human gut their home. This gut “microbiome” influences our physiology and health in ways that scientists are only beginning to understand. Now, a new study suggests that gut bacteria can even mess with the mind, altering brain chemistry and changing mood and behavior.” The indications are mounting that, […]

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Your Gut Bacteria Are What You Eat – ScienceNOW

“A large European-Asian consortium brought some order to the chaos when it reported in a Nature paper in April that humanity can be roughly divided into three “enterotypes” depending on which genus of bacteria dominates in people’s gut: Bacteroides, Ruminococcus, or Prevotella. People’s enterotype appeared to be stable over time, but it remains unclear why […]

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PLoS Biology: Endosymbiosis: Lessons in Conflict Resolution

“In sum, the past few years have witnessed a surge of new empirical and theoretical approaches to understand the dynamics of bacterial–insect relationships. These tools have shed light on the roles of recombination, selection, and mutation on endosymbiont genome evolution and have highlighted parameters that shape the outcome of genetic conflicts between hosts and symbionts. […]

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