Human permanence and nature’s flow

When I fly, I try to sit by the window. Night or day, the world from the plane is quite interesting, providing perspectives on humanity, the planet, time and space. Flying over the plains of the US one can see large expanses of regularly shaped farms, straight roads, and lots of flat territory. One time, […]

Hey Bruins, it’s concentração time

Every Bruins fan knows that this year our favorite team has been struggling at home. On the road, Bruins are 23-7-3, which, by this table, ranks them as the second best on-the-road record in the league. At home, it’s a vastly different story. With a record of 15-16-5, Boston is in the bottom quartile, sitting at […]

Thoughts on “The age of indie fitness apps is over”

I officially left the mobile world back in ’09. But, of course, since then, we’ve seen the meteoric rise of the iPhone, folks getting the idea of mobile apps, and a wave of small companies realizing the value of merging GPS, mobile, and tracking – I didn’t get too far. As a not-so-clueless observer (here’s an article I wrote […]

“Settings are for geeks”

As far back as I can remember, I’ve fiddled with the settings. Computers, lab instruments, routers, phones – a chief selling point was how much access I had to settings and how much could be customized. I recall that during my “Cloud” project at Nokia, the folks at IDEO used to say “Settings are for […]

Will Clinton push for university accountability for student loans?

This presidential election cycle will likely continue the growing discussion around higher-ed, loans, and student debt. I’ve been trying to parse out what folks are saying and proposing. One thing I’m concerned with is the difference in interest that students pay versus what banks pay when borrowing from the government. It would be nice if the […]

Is OpenTrons the Makerbot of biotech? In some ways.

When I was a molecular biologist, folks used to ask me what I did. I used to say, “Squirt things into tubes and wait.” OpenTrons takes that drudgery out of liquid handling for the usual molecular biology techniques (and would have saved me the last 20+years of tennis elbow). HAXLR8R, a hardware accelerator program, got, rightfully, excited with […]

I think it’s dead, Jim: When large companies kill small ones

I can think of many reasons a large company might buy a smaller one, only to kill them. For example: Perhaps it was a smaller competitor causing the larger company a headache Perhaps the smaller had created something that the larger was struggling to build but was failing and needed more time Perhaps the larger […]

Spam robot cut-up fiction

In one of my meanders through the web this weekend, I was reading about Jack Kerouac, which led to William S Burroughs, which led to Burroughs’ cut-up technique. Cut-up is when the author takes existing text, cuts it into pieces of words or stretches, and rearranges them into a new piece. It’s like sampling, but with […]

Ebola exposes chinks in our techno-optimistic armor

If you’re a bio-nerd like me, you’ve known about Ebola for a very long time. You knew it was trouble from the get-go and wondered how it would unfold should it get widespread. Well, now we know. But as things have unfolded, I see three things that I feel expose our techno-optimism for what it is: […]

Cow, goat, sheep, alpaca, camel, or buffalo? Which milk do you like?

I thoroughly enjoy making yogurt. But, of course, most yogurt is made of cow’s milk. I was able to find some goat and sheep milk yogurts in my local store. They were good. Interestingly, the sheep milk yogurt had the stronger flavour, which made it better to cook with than to have cereal or fruits with. […]